Restaurant Dining: Myrtle Beach, SC...

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     Now that Labor Day is behind us, you might want to consider heading to the beach. It's still warm, the crowds are gone, and prices are falling with the first of the leaves. Myrtle Beach is a great place to go in the off season. As with many beach towns though, dining can pose a quandary. Where can you eat that isn't a chain restaurant, that is still good, without breaking the bank?       Back in the spring, Drawl staffers did some tasty research. International food is the way to go in Myrtle Beach.  The Fat Greek's      We sauntered in to The Fat Greek's at 3:00 in the afternoon during the off season and found it packed with customers -- some of whom were Greek. This is definitely a good sign. The...

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An Interview with Milton Hall

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LO:  For those of our readers who don’t know you or your work yet, what can you tell us about your life in music and art thus far? In addition, though you’ve worked in a lot of different media, including visual and literary, so how specifically did you get your start in music? MH:  I grew up in a very rural area outside of town. The radio was the only link I had with the outside world. At some point in my early teens I stumbled upon 90.5 (WUSC – the best college radio station on the planet, in my completely biased opinion). I was pursuing the lower end of the dial and out comes “Sunday Bloody Sunday” by U2. That sounds so trite now but it seemed like a hidden world that I...

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$10 Travel: Aiken, SC

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     Got ten buckaroos and a hankerin’ for travel?      Take that Andrew Hamilton and head to Aiken, South Carolina for some good eats and a stroll through a small southern city with some serious old time charm. Less than an hour from the capitol of South Carolina and right next door to Augusta, Georgia, this Southern city is accessible and convenient for a day or weekend trip on the cheap. Hopelands Gardens1700 Whiskey Road, 10 a.m. to Sunset  Price: Free      Aiken is known for its thoroughbreds, horse races, and polo, and painted horse statues decorate the downtown. Veer onto a dirt road off downtown Whiskey Avenue, and you’ll inevitably pass several large and well kept stables and racing tracks. Continue down Whiskey to Hopelands Gardens, a public formal garden donated to the...

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Sweet Tea

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     It wouldn’t be summer in the South without sweet tea. Perfect for sipping on porch swings, lake docks and the like, this refresher is often reported to have originated at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. Though the drink was popularized there, most culinary historians now agree that sweet tea actually developed in the South long before 1904.      The first tea plants in the US were harvested around Charleston, South Carolina in the late 1700’s. Shortly after, many American (and English) cookbooks began including recipes for serving tea cold, though most of the early recipes were for green tea to be brewed and served with copious amounts of booze for tea punches. Sweetened iced black tea recipes began appearing the latter half of the nineteenth century, most notably in The Kentucky...

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Review: Well Water Communion...

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     My first full listen to Well Water Communion took place on a Sunday evening. The air was cool, the moon was full, and I had my car window rolled down on a drive home. It was the kind of night that beckoned for an adventure. Every adventure deserves a good soundtrack and, on cool, moonlit Sunday nights, you could scarce ask for a better soundtrack than the debut album by The Royal Tinfoil.      To hear them tell it, The Royal Tinfoil describe their music as drunken Gypsy sex. While I've never had the privilege of witnessing the mating habits of the drunken Gypsy – especially not that of the breed that hails from Charleston, SC, as the Tinfoil does – if I was to think about it long enough, I'm sure I'd...

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