Restaurant Dining: Myrtle Beach, SC...

by

     Now that Labor Day is behind us, you might want to consider heading to the beach. It's still warm, the crowds are gone, and prices are falling with the first of the leaves. Myrtle Beach is a great place to go in the off season. As with many beach towns though, dining can pose a quandary. Where can you eat that isn't a chain restaurant, that is still good, without breaking the bank?       Back in the spring, Drawl staffers did some tasty research. International food is the way to go in Myrtle Beach.  The Fat Greek's      We sauntered in to The Fat Greek's at 3:00 in the afternoon during the off season and found it packed with customers -- some of whom were Greek. This is definitely a good sign. The...

read more

A Northern Transplant and Her Chickens...

by

     As a new resident of Alabama and a total foreigner to the land below the Mason Dixon line, I learned quickly to disregard the suggestions of my GPS, always ask about the origins of the meat cooking over the campfire, and to be wary of bags that move on their own. I became familiar with all varieties of a Waffle House hashbrown, and figured out grits (sort of). I went to my first crawfish boil and figured out how to eat the tiny lobsters, and casually observed a timber rattlesnake without running away or even flinching. I drank more sweet tea than is recommended. I became accustomed to the fake deer head that hung over the fireplace and then adorned it with Mardi Gras beads and Christmas lights. I was as near to...

read more

How Prepared Are You?

by

     Anyone living on or near the coast understands the internal tension that comes from hearing weather professionals declare that hurricane season is upon us. Every June 1st, meteorologists turn their eyes to the oceans and await the development of a circular pattern of stormy weather that may eventually become a hurricane. They create tracking maps and use historical models to predict the storm’s ultimate destination. Unfortunately, despite the high level of technology available, Mother Nature is unpredictable. In order to alleviate some of the stress that comes with the hurricane tracking, it’s a good idea for individuals to develop a plan for their families. That way when a storm does pose a threat, it’s a smoother process to prepare. When hurricane season begins, it’s imperative to confirm that you have the appropriate supplies...

read more

Nick Autry: Cause & the Cure...

by

    It’s common and cliche to think it’s hard to stay true to yourself in Nashville and in the music industry as a whole. Maybe that’s true for any field where you find success and dig in. However, Nick Autry’s music is as real and true as it’s ever been, and his fresh release, Cause and the Cure, is a testament to his talent and drive as a genuine artist. His attitude about performing is such a testament, too. I was lucky to hear the new songs on a Friday afternoon this past summer at an outdoor event downtown. Unfortunately, Autry was scheduled to go on during rush hour and the sky showed all indications of imminent downpour. Adding to the confusion, folks from a Bible convention (yes, a Bible convention) milled in and...

read more

Sidewalk Film Festival 2012: Eating Alabama...

by

     The sky was steel grey and every few minutes let loose with a smattering of large, sparse raindrops. Yet despite the threat of the storm, the line of people beneath the lighted billboard of the historic Alabama Theater on 3rd Avenue North in the theatre district of downtown Birmingham continued to lengthen, extending down the sidewalk and wrapping around the last building on the corner.      Fittingly, they were all hungry – hungry for a taste of one of the most talked about documentary films of the 2012 Sidewalk Film Festival – Eating Alabama, a project directed by filmmaker and University of Alabama Documentary film professor Andrew Beck Grace, about ten minutes away from making its statewide premiere.      According to their event pamphlet, the Sidewalk Film Festival “is an annual production of...

read more

Revival of an American Storyteller: My Walk with Kathryn Tucker Windham...

by

     They came from an era vastly different from our own.      In medieval times, people combined stories, poetry, music, and dance as a form of entertainment. The ones who excelled at this practice were revered and respected, often reaping the greatest benefits of their talents as honored members of royal courts. The people called them troubadours or minstrels, and women held these roles just as frequently as men.      They journeyed from land to land gathering news and learning favorite tales of the regions. Often they developed their own stories but sometimes… sometimes, they took bits and pieces of other people’s tales and adventures and embellished them with their own. It is said that good storytellers have the ability to hold an audience in the palm of their hand, observing their reactions and...

read more
s2Member®