Sweet Tea

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     It wouldn’t be summer in the South without sweet tea. Perfect for sipping on porch swings, lake docks and the like, this refresher is often reported to have originated at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. Though the drink was popularized there, most culinary historians now agree that sweet tea actually developed in the South long before 1904.      The first tea plants in the US were harvested around Charleston, South Carolina in the late 1700’s. Shortly after, many American (and English) cookbooks began including recipes for serving tea cold, though most of the early recipes were for green tea to be brewed and served with copious amounts of booze for tea punches. Sweetened iced black tea recipes began appearing the latter half of the nineteenth century, most notably in The Kentucky...

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Sweet Tea

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Sweet Tea Yields 1 gallon Ingredients 1 gallon of cold water, divided 1 cup granulated sugar 2 family sized iced tea bags, such as Luzianne mint leaves or lemon slices, for serving Procedure Bring 2 quart of water to a boil over high heat. Add the sugar, stir to combine, remove from the heat and cool for 5 minutes. Add the tea bags to the sugar water and steep for 8 minutes. Remove the tea bags. Combine the tea and remaining water in a large pitcher. Chill before serving. Fresh brewed tea lasts about a week in the...

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Sweet Tea Grilled Pork Chops

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Sweet Tea Grilled Pork ChopsYield 4 servings Ingredients 2 cups Sweet Tea1/4 cup kosher salt1 teaspoon red pepper flake4 12 ounce bone-in pork loin chops, approximately 1 inch thick Procedure Combine the sweet tea, salt and red pepper flake in a gallon sized zip-top bag. Add the pork chops and brine the chops for at least 2 hours or overnight. Heat a gas grill to high, or ignite a chimney starter’s worth of lump charcoal for a kettle grill and wait until the coals are ash-white to dump them into the grill. Remove chops from the brine, rinse and pat dry. Set the chops on the grill and cook covered for 4 minutes. Rotate the chops 45 degrees, cover, and grill for another 4 minutes. Flip the chops, cover, and grill for 4 more...

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Elotes from Melissa’s Roasted Corn...

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ElotesServes 6Reprinted with permission from The Food Truck Cookbook by John T. Edge      The typical cheese used for elotes is cotija añejo, dry, grainy stuff from Mexico. It’s fairly salty. Grated “parmesan,” shaken from those green cylindrical cans, is a common substitute. I’m not saying you should follow suit. I’m just saying that’s what some people do. Here’s the right way, inspired by the elotes from Melissa’s Roasted Corn. You can grill the corn over charcoal or cook it indoors in a skillet. If you prefer to eat yours en vaso (in a cup), see the variation [directional, below]. Ingredients 6 ears corn, in their husks1/2 cup mayonnaise3 cups crumbled Cotija añejo or shredded queso fresco3 tablespoons chili powderSalt Procedure Soak the corn, in the husks, in water to cover for about 30...

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Review: The Food Truck Cookbook...

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     Food trucks are a continuing trend in the Southern States. Once reserved for bigger cities like New York and Los Angeles, the slow growing economy has brought the popular mobile eateries to smaller cities including Durham, North Carolina; Austin, Texas; and Atlanta, Georgia. Atlanta has just installed its own Food Truck Park this summer. Not limited just hot dogs and pizza, there are trucks hocking gourmet grilled cheeses, slow smoked barbeque, popsicles, ice cream, cupcakes, and pies too.      Who better track this trend than a writer who has not only dedicated himself to preserving our Southern Foodways but has also experienced the thrills of running a mobile food business himself? John T. Edge’s newest book: [italicize] The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America’s Best Restaurants on Wheels devours the...

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